Worldwide Observance of Chrismukkah 2005 Expected to Grow This Year with More Interfaith Family Celebration

The interfaith celebration of Chrismukkah is poised to attract an even larger number of devotees this holiday season as the novel celebration's appeal takes firmer hold worldwide.

Chrismukkah.com, the Montana-based company credited with popularizing Chrismukkah and catapulting it into a new international tradition, has enhanced its Chrismukkah offerings to include new Chrismukkah greeting cards, gift line, CDs, and cookbook

"We anticipate even greater participation in Chrismukkah festivities this season, because ethnic diversity, religious freedom and lifestyle tolerance are very much a part of public consciousness," says Ron Gompertz, co-founder of Chrismukkah.com.

An unusual confluence of the calendar this year, with Hanukkah beginning on December 25th, also is expected to enhance awareness of Chrismukkah. Gompertz believes all these factors combine to create "perfect storm" conditions for Chrismukkah observance. He gleefully calls the Chrismukkah 2005 season the "Mother of all Chrismukkahs."

This year's line of interfaith holiday cards features an original collection of clever, whimsical designs and greetings that mix icons from both Hanukkah and Christmas. One design, for instance, features bagels garnished with cream cheese and holly and wishing "Good Cheer with a Schmear."

Another card features instructions on how to build a Matzah bread house. There are 19 holiday cards, along with an original line of gifts, from tee- shirts to ornaments to Chrismukkah postage stamps.

The Chrismukkah.com offerings solve an annual holiday dilemma: what greetings and gifts to send to interfaith families and friends and mixed-faith individuals.

Chrismukkah officially began as a new holiday tradition in 2004 after interfaith couple Ron Gompertz, a Jew from New York City, and his Midwestern, Protestant wife Michelle, launched Chrismukkah.com to help millions of people with Jewish and Christian persuasions share the joy of both Hanukkah and Christmas with family and friends.

Gompertz estimates there are 10 million Americans with combined Jewish and Christian faith or in interfaith families.

Gompertz notes: "Chrismukkah is not a new religion and is not intended to replace the individual holidays of Christmas and Hanukkah, but we hope to encourage awareness of Jewish identity and embracing of Jewish holiday traditions within interfaith families and among half-Jews."

Source: Chrismukkah.com
BOZEMAN, Mont., Oct. 11 /PRNewswire/ --

May aslo be spelt as Christmukah, Chrismmukah, Crismukkah, Chrismukka, Christmukkah, Christmukka, Hanukkah, Chanukah, Chanuka, Chrismas

'Chrismukkah' Greeting Cards Launched for
Interfaith Americans Who
Celebrate both Hanukkah and Christmas

LIVINGSTON, Mont., Nov. 11, 2003 /PRNewswire/ -- An interfaith couple has solved an annual predicament for millions of Americans with both Jewish and Christian persuasions -- sharing the joy of both Hanukkah and Christmas with family and friends.

Although they have encountered resistance from conservative Jewish organizations and media, Ron and Michelle Gompertz have launched a line of beautifully-designed whimsical greeting cards that celebrate 'Chrismukkah.'

"Chrismukkah is a blend of favorite traditions from both Hanukkah and Christmas," said Ron Gompertz, a Jew, who along with his Protestant wife Michelle, began observing Chrismukkah officially last year. "Chrismukkah is celebrated by mixed-faith couples, interfaith families, half-Jews, and others. Chrismukkah is a new name for the way millions of people experience the holidays together each year."

Chrismukkah.com features an original collection of clever, sophisticated interfaith holiday cards mixing icons from both Hanukkah and Christmas. One design, for instance, features a bowl of chicken soup with matzoh balls stacked three high to resemble a snowman. Another card wishes "Merry Mazeltov," while another includes a recipe for kosher fruitcake.

The site also contains information and links of interest to interfaith families.

Millions of Interfaith Americans
The Gompertz's are among a growing number of interfaith couples where one spouse is Jewish and the other is not. A national Jewish population survey, conducted by the United Jewish Communities (UJC) in 2000-01 and corroborated by an American Jewish Committee (AJC) survey, counted 5.2 million adult Jews living in the US and found that of all married ones, nearly 1/3 are married to non-Jews. The UJC poll further reported that nearly half of all Jewish newlyweds within the past five years had chosen non-Jewish spouses.

Respect for Tradition
Assimilation and the loss of Jewish identity, as well as population, are major concerns within the Jewish community, Ron noted. "One of Chrismukkah.com's goals is to encourage awareness of Jewish identity and embracing of Jewish holiday traditions within interfaith families and among half-Jews."

"Michelle and I deeply respect the religious observances of Christmas and Hanukkah as individual holidays," he said. "Chrismukkah is not intended to replace either."

Source: Chrismukkah.com

Music From the
O.C. Mix 3:
Have a Very
Merry Chrismukkah