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TUCSON DESERT ART MUSEUM “THE REDRESS PROJECT”

Friday, January 10, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - Saturday, January 11, 2020 @ 7:00 pm MST

TUCSON DESERT ART MUSEUM HOSTS THE ACCLAIMED “THE REDRESS PROJECT” Highlighting the plight of missing & murdered women and girls with nationally acclaimed art installation, the museum’s opening reception features a special Southwest premiere documentary screening and opening ceremony.

What: Exhibition opening and special event for The REDress Project, which brings to light the devastating plight of Native American women and girls who go missing or are murdered at alarmingly high rates compared to the national average. The evening will feature an introductory talk by film producer and Global Indigenous Council Executive Director Rain Bear Stands Last, an exclusive screening of the film Somebody’s Daughter, and a talk by acclaimed artist Jaime Black, who will provide insights into her powerful art installation of red dresses.

Where: Tucson Desert Art Museum: 7000 East Tanque Verde Road, Tucson, AZ 85715

When: Saturday, January 11th from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM

Who: Métis artist Jaime Black; Global Indigenous Council Executive Director Rain Bear Stands Last; and Scholar, Poet, Community Leader at The University of Arizona Dr. Ofelia Zepeda. The public interested in women’s issues, women’s health and safety, women’s art, Native American women, art.

Cost: Free for Students, Native Americans with Tribal IDs, and Museum members, $5 general admission

The Tucson Desert Art Museum (TDART) will be hosting an event on Saturday, January 11th, 2020 from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM as a special opening for The REDress Project installation. Recently held at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, The REDress Project is Jaime Black’s powerful installation focusing on the alarming occurrence of missing or murdered indigenous women through empty red dresses.

The absence recalls the women who wore the dress, and red has several symbolic meanings. As told to Black by an indigenous friend, red is the only color spirits can see. Red also calls back the spirits of these women and allows them a chance to be among us. By displaying empty red dresses, Black allows these missing or murdered women to be seen and heard. The exhibition will open with a special Southwest Premiere screening of the Global Indigenous Council’s (GIC) film “Somebody’s Daughter.”

Introduced by GIC Executive Director Rain Bear Stands Last, this film highlights the staggering statistics of missing and murdered indigenous women. According to the Urban Indian Health Institute (UIHI), Arizona had the third highest number of cases of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls in the United States. Arizona accounted for 54 of the 506 cases studied, behind Washington and New Mexico. Of Arizona’s 54 cases, 31 originated in Tucson.

Given these statistics, it is crucial that awareness is increased about this epidemic, particularly in Arizona, where over a quarter of the land is federally protected reservation land and nearly 300,000 Native Americans live. After the film, there will be an opening ceremony by University of Arizona Scholar, Poet, and Community Elder Dr. Ofelia Zepeda. Please join us to honor missing and murdered indigenous women and to learn more about this crisis.

Guests are invited either before the film screening and artist talk, or afterwards, to visit the Museum and view The REDress Project and the Museum collection. (Free in exhibition area. Museum admission applies for entrance to rest of Museum.) About Tucson Desert Art Museum The Tucson Desert Art Museum, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, opened its doors on November 1, 2013 with a mission to display art and artifacts of the Desert Southwest and its surrounding regions, and educate our guests about the history, cultures, and art of the region. At the core of the Museum is one of the Southwest’s premier collections of Navajo and Hopi pre-1940s textiles, including displays of chief’s blankets, Navajo saddle blankets, optical art textiles and Yei weavings.

The Museum also has a diverse range of historical artifacts, classic and contemporary Southwestern paintings. Special highlights of the museum include exhibits on Navajo sand painting, early armaments of the Southwest, and artifacts from the Mesoamerican period. Our motto is “visualize history through art.” We invite our guests to immerse themselves in history through our beautiful art! ###

TUCSON DESERT ART MUSEUM HIGHLIGHTS CONTEMPORARY NATIVE AMERICAN FEMALE ART

Contemporary Native American women artists featured in exclusive exhibition & reception What: Opening reception and roundtable discussion: “Ever-Evolving Native American Female Art” for the Museum exhibition Art is the Seed: Contemporary Native American Female Art Inspired by Traditional Crafts

Where: Tucson Desert Art Museum: 7000 East Tanque Verde Road, Tucson, AZ 85715

When: Friday, January 10th from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

Who: Marla Allison (Laguna Pueblo painter); Dr. Barbara Mills (University of Arizona Regents’ Professor of Anthropology and Curator of Archaeology); Reid Gómez (writer, scholar, and University of Arizona Assistant Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies); the public interested in women’s art, public interested in Native American women, art Cost: Free for Students, Native Americans with Tribal IDs, and Museum members, $5 general admission

The Tucson Desert Art Museum (TDART) will be hosting an event on Friday, January 10th, 2020 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM as a special opening for the exhibition Art is the Seed: Contemporary Native American Female Art Inspired by Traditional Crafts. The exhibition will feature contemporary art by Native American artists Cara Romero, Marla Alison, Sarah Sense, Natani Notah and Darby Raymond-Overstreet, in addition to historic artifacts generously loaned by Mark Sublette Medicine Man Gallery. For generations, Native American women’s art has largely been ignored by the established art community, including situations where women’s work has been signed by men, further pushing women artists into silence.

This exhibition takes a powerful tradition of female artists and speaks out with modern expression. The women artists on display take traditional craft arts from their heritage and transform them with contemporary twists to give voice to the multi-generational women artist community. The panel will feature Marla Allison (Laguna Pueblo painter), Dr. Barbara Mills (U of A Regents’ Professor of Anthropology and Curator of Archaeology), and Dr. Reid Gómez (writer, scholar, and UofA Assistant Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies). Discussions will be centered on indigenous female-dominated arts and crafts of the American Southwest, and how makers of the past and present have drawn inspiration and power from the creativity of the matriarchs who came before them. The panel will explore the evolution of crafts from a historic perspective, how Native American artists today build on the previous legacies of others and how one generation has often built off the last to create new and contemporary artforms.

Curator Alyssa Travis stated, “We are honored to exhibit such a powerful selection of artworks from Indigenous artists, past and present. The contemporary works on display reflect the artists’ personal attitudes towards what it means to be a contemporary Indigenous woman today. The panel will be an excellent opportunity to hear the stories behind some of the artworks and to learn more about how art has connected generations of women in the past and present.”

Guests are encouraged during the evening to visit the Museum and view the Art is the Seed exhibition. About Tucson Desert Art Museum The Tucson Desert Art Museum, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, opened its doors on November 1, 2013 with a mission to display art and artifacts of the Desert Southwest and its surrounding regions, and educate our guests about the history, cultures, and art of the region. At the core of the Museum is one of the Southwest’s premier collections of Navajo and Hopi pre-1940s textiles, including displays of chief’s blankets, Navajo saddle blankets, optical art textiles and Yei weavings.

The Museum also has a diverse range of historical artifacts, classic and contemporary Southwestern paintings. Special highlights of the museum include exhibits on Navajo sand painting, early armaments of the Southwest, and artifacts from the Mesoamerican period. Our motto is “visualize history through art.” We invite our guests to immerse themselves in history through our beautiful art!

Details

Start:
Friday, January 10, 2020 @ 7:00 pm
End:
Saturday, January 11, 2020 @ 7:00 pm
Event Categories:
, ,

Venue

Tucson Desert Art Museum
7000 E. Tanque Verde Road
Tucson, AZ 85715 United States
+ Google Map
Phone:
520-202-3888
Website:
tucsondart.org

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